Jerry Brito bitcoin Liberty Blitzkrieg

Cheddar (a new business news network) will be discussing Bitcoin w/ Coin Center's Jerry Brito LIVE here at ~3:50PM Eastern

Cheddar (a new business news network) will be discussing Bitcoin w/ Coin Center's Jerry Brito LIVE here at ~3:50PM Eastern submitted by neerajka to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Cheddar (a new business news network) will be discussing Bitcoin w/ Coin Center's Jerry Brito LIVE here at ~3:50PM Eastern

Cheddar (a new business news network) will be discussing Bitcoin w/ Coin Center's Jerry Brito LIVE here at ~3:50PM Eastern submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

New York's financial regulator releases a draft of ‘BitLicense’ for Bitcoin businesses. Here are my initial thoughts. Jerry Brito

New York's financial regulator releases a draft of ‘BitLicense’ for Bitcoin businesses. Here are my initial thoughts. Jerry Brito submitted by jakob_Z to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Jerry Brito Explains Bitcoin Potential to New Jersey Bitcoin Legislators

Jerry Brito Explains Bitcoin Potential to New Jersey Bitcoin Legislators submitted by BTCNews to BTCNews [link] [comments]

Self-Proclaimed Satoshi Craig Wright Files US Copyright Registrations for BTC White Paper

Self-Proclaimed Satoshi Craig Wright Files US Copyright Registrations for BTC White Paper
https://preview.redd.it/s5hpkqklfpz21.png?width=1024&format=png&auto=webp&s=ec38d36e451fed5d3c95f5e4b97fd9ef09025127
Craig Wright has filed United States copyright registrations for the Bitcoin (BTC) white paper authored by Satoshi Nakamoto.
Court documents show that the U.S. Copyright Office has registrations with Wright as the authorof the white paper, as well as most of the original code used to build Bitcoin.
The Australian entrepreneur has long claimed to have written the cryptocurrency blueprint under the pseudonym.
A news release from May 21 claims that U.S. officials have received confirmation that Wright is indeed Satoshi Nakamoto, but the news has been met with skepticism from some crypto commentators.
Jerry Brito, executive director at non-profit organization Coin Center, tweeted:
“Registering a copyright is just filing a form. The Copyright Office does not investigate the validity of the claim; they just register it. Unfortunately there is no official way to challenge a registration. If there are competing claims, the Office will just register all of them.”
According to the news release, Wright is making moves to establish himself as Bitcoin’s creator “after being dismayed to see his original Bitcoin design bastardized by protocol developer groups.”
It is believed that Wright is planning to assign the copyright registrations to the Bitcoin Association.
The businessman is currently the chief scientist at a startup known as nChain. The entrepreneur has been known for attracting controversy, with major crypto platforms recently beginning to boycott bitcoin sv (BSV,) the fork of bitcoin cash (BCH) which he backs.
submitted by Rajladumor1 to omgfin [link] [comments]

Self-Proclaimed Satoshi Craig Wright Files US Copyright Registrations for BTC White Paper.

Self-Proclaimed Satoshi Craig Wright Files US Copyright Registrations for BTC White Paper.

https://preview.redd.it/2w5i71wwwu031.png?width=740&format=png&auto=webp&s=ae7f558bbda4dfb855f6f856de5914ff2f297a02

Craig Wright has filed United States copyright registrations for the Bitcoin (BTC) white paper authored by Satoshi Nakamoto.

Court documents show that the U.S. Copyright Office has registrations with Wright as the author of the white paper, as well as most of the original code used to build Bitcoin.

The Australian entrepreneur has long claimed to have written the cryptocurrency blueprint under the pseudonym.

A news release from May 21 claims that U.S. officials have received confirmation that Wright is indeed Satoshi Nakamoto, but the news has been met with skepticism from some crypto commentators.

Jerry Brito, executive director at non-profit organization Coin Center, tweeted:

“Registering a copyright is just filing a form. The Copyright Office does not investigate the validity of the claim; they just register it. Unfortunately there is no official way to challenge a registration. If there are competing claims, the Office will just register all of them.”

According to the news release, Wright is making moves to establish himself as Bitcoin’s creator “after being dismayed to see his original Bitcoin design bastardized by protocol developer groups.”

It is believed that Wright is planning to assign the copyright registrations to the Bitcoin Association.

The businessman is currently the chief scientist at a startup known as nChain. The entrepreneur has been known for attracting controversy, with major crypto platforms recently beginning to boycott bitcoin sv (BSV,) the fork of bitcoin cash (BCH) which he backs.
submitted by abbiemetzp45 to crypto_signal [link] [comments]

SegWit would make it HARDER FOR YOU TO PROVE YOU OWN YOUR BITCOINS. SegWit deletes the "chain of (cryptographic) signatures" - like MERS (Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems) deleted the "chain of (legal) title" for Mortgage-Backed Securities (MBS) in the foreclosure fraud / robo-signing fiasco

Summary (TL;DR)

Many people who study the financial crisis which started in 2008 know about "MERS", or "Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems" - a company / database containing over 62 million mortgages.
(The word "mortgages" may be unfamiliar to some non-English speakers - since it is not a cognate with most other languages. In French, they say "hypothèques", or "hipotecas" in Spanish, "Hypotheken" in German, etc).
The goal of MERS was to "optimize" the process of transferring "title" (legal ownership) of real-estate mortgages, from one owner to another.
But instead, in the 2010 "foreclosure crisis", MERS caused tens of billions of dollars in losses and damages - due to the "ususual" way it handled the crucial "ownership data" for real-estate mortgages - the data at the very heart of the database.
https://duckduckgo.com/?q=%22foreclosure+fraud%22+%22robo+signing%22+MERS&t=h_&ia=web
How did MERS handle this crucial "ownership data" for real-estate mortgages?
The "brilliant" idea behind MERS to "optimize" the process of conveying (transferring) mortgages was to separate - and eventually delete - all the data proving who transferred what to whom!
Hmm... that sounds vaguely familiar. What does that remind me of?
SegWit separating and then deleting the "chain of (cryptographic) signatures" for bitcoins sounds a lot like MERS separating and then deleting the "chain of (legal) title" for mortgages.
So, SegWit and MERS have a lot in common:
Of course, the "experts" (on Wall Street, and at AXA-owned Blockstream) present MERS and SegWit as "innovations" - as a way to "optimize" and "streamline" vast chains of transactions reflecting ownership and transfer of valuable items (ie, real-estate mortgages, and bitcoins).
But, unfortunately, the "brilliant bat-shit insane approach" devised by the "geniuses" behind MERS and SegWit to do this is to simply delete the data which proved ownership and transfer of these items - information which is essential for legal purposes (in the case of mortgages), or security purposes (in the case of bitcoins).
So, the most pernicious aspect of SegWit may be that it encourages deleting all of Bitcoin's cryptographic security data - destroying the "chain of signatures" which (according to the white paper) are what define what a "bitcoin" actually is.
Wow, deleting signatures with SegWit sounds bad. Can I avoid SegWit?
Yes you can.
To guarantee the long-term cryptographic, legal and financial security of your bitcoins:

Details

MERS = "The dog ate your mortgage's chain of title".
SegWit = "The dog ate your bitcoin's chain of signatures."
Wall Street-backed MERS = AXA-backed SegWit
It is probably no coincidence that:
How is AXA related to Blockstream?
Insurance multinational AXA, while not a household name, is actually the second-most-connected "fiat finance" firm in the world.
AXA's former CEO Pierre Castries was head of the secretive Bilderberg Group of the world's ultra-rich. (Recently, he moved on to HSBC.)
Due to AXA's massive exposure to derivatives (bigger than any other insurance company), it is reasonable to assume that AXA would be destroyed if Bitcoin reaches trillions of dollars in market cap as a major "counterparty-free" asset class - which would actually be quite easy using simple & safe on-chain scaling - ie, just using bigger blocks, and no SegWit.
So, the above facts provide one plausible explanation of why AXA-owned Blockstream seems to be quietly trying to undermine Bitcoin...
Do any Core / Blockstream devs and supporters know about MERS - and recognize its dangerous parallels with SegWit?
It would be interesting to hear from some of the "prominent" Core / Blockstream devs and supporters listed below to find out if they are aware of the dangerous similarities between SegWit and MERS:
Finally, it could also be interesting to hear from:
Core / Blockstream devs might not know about MERS - but AXA definitely does
While it is likely that most or all Core / Blockstream devs do not know about the MERS fiasco...
...it is 100% certain that people at AXA (the main owners of Blockstream) do know about MERS.
This is because the global financial crisis which started in 2008 was caused by:
The major financial media and blogs (Naked Capitalism, Zero Hedge, Credit Slips, Washington's Blog, etc.) covered MERS extensively:
https://duckduckgo.com/?q=site%3Anakedcapitalism.com+mers&t=h_&ia=web
https://duckduckgo.com/?q=site%3Azerohedge.com+mers&t=h_&ia=web
https://duckduckgo.com/?q=site%3Acreditslips.org+mers&t=h_&ia=web
https://duckduckgo.com/?q=site%3Awashingtonsblog.com+mers&t=h_&ia=web
So people at all the major "fiat finance firms" such as AXA would of course be aware of CDOs, MBSs and MERS - since these have been "hot topics" in their industry since the start of the global financial crisis in 2008.
Eerie parallels between MERS and SegWit
Read the analysis below of MERS by legal scholar Christopher Peterson - and see if you notice the eerie parallels with SegWit (with added emphasis in bold, and commentary in square brackets):
http://scholarship.law.wm.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3399&context=wmlr
Loans originated with MERS as the original mortgagee purport to separate the borrower’s promissory note, which is made payable to the originating lender, from the borrower’s conveyance of a mortgage, which purportedly is granted to MERS. If this separation is legally incorrect - as every state supreme court looking at the issue has agreed - then the security agreements do not name an actual mortgagee or beneficiary.
The mortgage industry, however, has premised its proxy recording strategy on this separation, despite the U.S. Supreme Court’s holding that “the note and mortgage are inseparable.” [Compare with the language from Satoshi's whitepaper: "We define an electronic coin as a chain of digital signatures."]
If today’s courts take the Carpenter decision at its word, then what do we make of a document purporting to create a mortgage entirely independent of an obligation to pay? If the Supreme Court is right that a “mortgage can have no separate existence” from a promissory note, then a security agreement that purports to grant a mortgage independent of the promissory note attempts to convey something that cannot exist.
[...]
Many courts have held that a document attempting to convey an interest in realty fails to convey that interest if the document does not name an eligible grantee. Courts around the country have long held that “there must be, in every grant, a grantor, a grantee and a thing granted, and a deed wanting in either essential is absolutely void.”
The parallels between MERS and SegWit are obvious and inescapable.
Note that I am not arguing here that SegWit could be vulnerable to attacks from a strictly legal perspective. (Although that may be possible to.)
I am simply arguing that SegWit, because it encourages deleting the (cryptographic) signature data which defines "bitcoins", could eventually be vulnerable to attacks from a cryptographic perspective.
But I heard that SegWit is safe and tested!
Yeah, we've heard a lot of lies from Blockstream, for years - and meanwhile, they've only succeeded in destroying Bitcoin's market cap, due to unnecessarily high fees and unnecessarily slow transactions.
Now, in response to those legal-based criticisms of SegWit in the article from nChain, several so-called "Bitcoin legal experts" have tried to rebut that those arguments from nChain were somehow "flawed".
But if you read the rebuttals of these "Bitcoin legal experts", they sound a lot like the clueless "experts" who were cheerleading MERS for its "efficiency" - and who ended up costing tens billions of dollars in losses when the "chain of title" for mortgages held in the MERS database became "clouded" after all the crucial "ownership data" got deleted in the name of "efficiency" and "optimization".
In their attempt to rebut the article by nChain, these so-called "Bitcoin legal experts" use soothing language like "optimization" and "pragmatic" to try to lull you into believing that deleting the "chain of (cryptographic) signatures" for your bitcoins will be just as safe as deleting the "chain of (legal) notes" for mortgages:
http://www.coindesk.com/bitcoin-legal-experts-nchain-segwit-criticisms-flawed/
The (unsigned!) article on CoinDesk attempting to rebut Nguyen's article on nChain starts by stating:
Nguyen's criticisms fly in the face of what has emerged as broad support for the network optimization, which has been largely embraced by the network's developers, miners and startups as a pragmatic step forward.
Then it goes on to quote "Bitcoin legal experts" who claim that using SegWit to delete Bitcoin's cryptographic signatures will be just fine:
Marco Santori, a fintech lawyer who leads the blockchain tech team at Cooley LLP, for example, took issue with what he argued was the confused framing of the allegation.
Santori told CoinDesk:
"It took the concept of what is a legal contract, and took the position that if you have a blockchain signature it has something to do with a legal contract."
And:
Stephen Palley, counsel at Washington, DC, law firm Anderson Kill, remarked similarly that the argument perhaps put too much weight on the idea that the "signatures" involved in executing transactions on the bitcoin blockchain were or should be equivalent to signatures used in digital documents.
"It elides the distinction between signature and witness data and a digital signature, and they're two different things," Palley said.
And:
"There are other ways to cryptographically prove a transaction is correctly signed other than having a full node," said BitGo engineer Jameson Lopp. "The assumption that if a transaction is in the blockchain, it's probably valid, is a fairly good guarantee."
Legal experts asserted that, because of this design, it's possible to prove that the transaction occurred between parties, even if those involved did not store signatures.
For this reason, Coin Center director Jerry Brito argued that nChain is overstating the issues that would arise from the absence of this data.
"If you have one-time proof that you have the bitcoin, if you don't have it and I have it, logically it was signed over to me. As long as somebody in the world keeps the signature data and it's accessible, it's fine," he said.
There are several things you can notice here:
  • These so-called "Bitcoin legal experts" are downplaying the importance of signatures in Bitcoin - just like the "experts" behind MERS downplayed the importance of "notes" for mortgages.
  • Satoshi said that a bitcoin is a "chain of digital signatures" - but these "Bitcoin legal experts" are now blithely asserting that we can simply throw the "chain of digital signatures" in the trash - and we can be "fairly" certain that everything will "probably" be ok.
  • The "MERS = SegWit" argument which I'm making is not based on interpreting Bitcoin signatures in any legal sense (although some arguments could be made along those lines).
  • Instead, I'm just arguing that any "ownership database" which deletes its "ownership data" (whether it's MERS or SegWit) is doomed to end in disaster - whether that segregated-and-eventually-deleted "ownership data" is based on law (with MERS), or cryptography (with SegWit).
Who's right - Satoshi or the new "Bitcoin experts"?
You can make up your own mind.
Personally, I will never send / receive / store large sums of money using any "SegWit" bitcoin addresses.
This, is not because of any legal considerations - but simply because I want the full security of "the chain of (cryptographic) signatures" - which, according to the whitepaper, is the very definition of what a bitcoin "is".
Here are the words of Satoshi, from the whitepaper, regarding the "chain of digital signatures":
https://www.bitcoin.com/bitcoin.pdf
We define an electronic coin as a chain of digital signatures. Each owner transfers the coin to the next by digitally signing a hash of the previous transaction and the public key of the next owner and adding these to the end of the coin. A payee can verify the signatures to verify the chain of ownership.
Does that "chain of digital signatures" sound like something you'd want to throw in the trash??
  • The "clever devs" from AXA-owned Blockstream (and a handful of so-called "Bitcoin legal experts) say "Trust us, it is safe to delete the chain of signatures proving ownership and transfer of bitcoins". They're pushing "SegWit" - the most radical change in the history of Bitcoin. As I have repeatedly discussed, SegWit weakens Bitcoin's security model.
  • The people who support Satoshi's original Bitcoin (and clients which continue to implement it: Bitcoin ABC, Bitcoin Unlimited, Bitcoin, Bitcoin Classic - all supporting "Bitcoin Cash" - ie "Bitcoin" without SegWit) say "Trust no one. You should never delete the chain of signatures proving ownership and transfer of your bitcoins."
  • Satoshi said:

We define an electronic coin as a chain of digital signatures.

  • So, according to Satoshi, a "chain of digital signatures" is the very definition of what a bitcoin is.
  • Meanwhile according to some ignorant / corrupt devs from AXA-owned Blockstream (and a handful of "Bitcoin legal experts") now suddenly it's "probably" "fairly" safe to just throw Satoshi's "chain of digital signatures" in the trash - all in the name of "innovation" and "efficiency" and "optimization" - because they're so very clever.
Who do you think is right?
Finally, here's another blatant lie from SegWit supporters (and small-block supporters)
Let's consider this other important quote from Satoshi's whitepaper above:
A payee can verify the signatures to verify the chain of ownership.
Remember, this is what "small blockers" have always been insisting for years.
They've constantly been saying that "blocks need to be 1 MB!!1 Waah!1!" - even though several years ago the Cornell study showed that blocks could already be 4 MB, with existing hardware and bandwidth.
But small-blockers have always insisted that everyone should store the entire blockchain - so they can verify their own transactions.
But hey, wait a minute!
Now they turn around and try to get you to use SegWit - which allows deleting the very data which insisted that you should download and save locally to verify your own transactions!
So, once again, this exposes the so-called "arguments" of small-blocks supporters as being fake arguments and lies:
  • On the one hand, they (falsely) claim that small blocks are necessary in order for everyone to be run "full nodes" because (they claim) that's the only way people can personally verify all their own transactions. By the way, there are already several errors here with what they're saying:
    • Actually "full nodes" is a misnomer (Blockstream propaganda). The correct terminology is "full wallets", because only miners are actually "nodes".
    • Actually 1 MB "max blocksize" is not necessary for this. The Cornell study showed that we could easily be using 4 MB or 8 MB blocks by now - since, as everyone knows, the average size of most web pages is already over 2 MB, and everyone routinely downloads 2 MB web pages in a matter of seconds, so in 10 minutes you could download - and upload - a lot more than just 2 MB. But whatever.
  • On the other hand, they support SegWit - and the purpose of SegWit is to allow people to delete the "signature data".
    • This conflicts with their argument the everyone should personally verify all their own transactions. For example, above, Coin Center director Jerry Brito was saying: "As long as somebody in the world keeps the signature data and it's accessible, it's fine."
    • So which is it? For years, the "small blockers" told us we needed to all be able to personally verify everything on our own node. And now SegWit supporters are telling us: "Naah - you can just rely on someone else's node."
    • Plus, while the transactions are still being sent around on the wire, the "signature data" is still there - it's just "segregated" - so you're not getting any savings on bandwidth anyways - you'd only get the savings if you delete the "signature data" from storage.
    • Storage is cheap and plentiful, it's never been the "bottleneck" in the system. Bandwidth is the main bottleneck - and SegWit doesn't help that at all, because it still transmits all the data.
Conclusion
So if you're confused by all the arguments from small-blockers and SegWitters, there's a good reason: their "arguments" are total bullshit and lies. They're attempting to contradict and destroy:
  • Satoshi's original design of Bitcoin as a "chain of digital signatures":
"We define an electronic coin as a chain of digital signatures. Each owner transfers the coin to the next by digitally signing a hash of the previous transaction and the public key of the next owner and adding these to the end of the coin. A payee can verify the signatures to verify the chain of ownership."
  • Satoshi's plan for scaling Bitcoin by simply increasing the goddamn blocksize:
Satoshi Nakamoto, October 04, 2010, 07:48:40 PM "It can be phased in, like: if (blocknumber > 115000) maxblocksize = largerlimit / It can start being in versions way ahead, so by the time it reaches that block number and goes into effect, the older versions that don't have it are already obsolete."
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/3wo9pb/satoshi_nakamoto_october_04_2010_074840_pm_it_can/
  • The the notorious mortgage database MERS, pushed by clueless and corrupt Wall Street bankers, deleted the "chain of (legal) title" which had been essential to show who conveyed what mortgages to whom - leading to "clouded titles", foreclosure fraud, and robo-signing.
  • The notorious SegWit soft fork / kludge, pushed by clueless and corrupt AXA-owned Blockstream devs, allows deleting the "chain of (cryptographic) signatures" which is essential to show who sent how many bitcoins to whom - which could lead to a catastrophe for people who foolishly use SegWit addresses (which can be avoided: unsafe "SegWit" bitcoin addresses start with a "3" - while safe, "normal" Bitcoin addresses start with a "1").
  • Stay safe and protect your bitcoin investment: Avoid SegWit transactions.
[See the comments from me directly below for links to several articles on MERS, foreclosure fraud, robo-signing, "clouded title", etc.]
submitted by ydtm to btc [link] [comments]

Battle Over Bitcoin: China Backs US Startup Coinbase And US Falls Behind In Virtual Currencies.

Indeed, virtual currencies are nothing new to the Chinese. For example, more than 100 million people on the social platform QQ have used the Q coin for more than 10 years. And after China’s state-run China Central Television, or CCTV, ran a half-hour-long documentary on bitcoins, downloads of apps for processing and “mining” bitcoins soared in the world’s second largest economy.
Bitcoin, long the plaything of the Western ubernerd, now appears poised to grow substantially in China and other markets, like the euro zone, where government meddling in native currency valuations has left many distrustful of the money in their bank accounts.
Americans don’t have this problem -- yet. And that may be a problem in itself. According to bitcoin proponents, if the U.S. tries to ignore the nascent currency, writing it off as a financial fad with less value than the seemingly stable dollar, Americans risk ceding to the Chinese and others control of the future of what could be the most disruptive force in monetary exchanges since the credit card. In turn, the dollar and the ability of the U.S. to navigate global currency conflicts could be seriously weakened.
“Here’s the bottom line: Bitcoin has much higher popularity outside the U.S. and much higher potential outside the U.S.,” observed Andreas M. Antonopoulos of the Bitcoin Foundation. “If you go to an American and say, ‘Hey, there’s this new thing, bitcoin,’ they say, ‘Well, what’s wrong with the dollar?’ That question is different in other countries.”
Bitcoins are a finite, Web-based currency created in 2009 by a group of hackers working under the nom-de-Internet Satoshi Nakamoto. Exactly 10,952,975 bitcoins are in circulation, all of which have been purchased on exchange networks or mined. The currency is mined using software that processes transactions on the bitcoin network, adding groups of transactions, called blocks, to the chain. Miners are paid about 25 bitcoins per block. That digital money can then be used to purchase a variety of goods online, from legitimate software to heroin on the infamous virtual black-market Silk Road.
Bitcoin surged in value to $266 last month, thrusting the currency into the mainstream spotlight as investment poured in from sources as diverse as the hapless Brothers Winklevoss (of Facebook infamy) and Union Capital Ventures principal Fred Wilson (an early investor in Zynga, Twitter, and Kickstarter). Suddenly, everyone was talking about buying bitcoins. But the bubble burst in late April, and in the U.S. at least, bitcoin faded from the news. That was not the case in China, where Antonopoulos said downloads of bitcoin clients have eclipsed those in the U.S.
Bitcoins are mined in several steps. After downloading a bitcoin client, such as Coinbase (which serves as a wallet in which to store the bits of code that constitute the digital money), miners often join pools where they share computing power to decode algorithms in which bitcoins are hidden. The concept of bitcoins and bitcoin mining is cryptic for many people, even some otherwise forward-thinking American investors. The irony is that, for now, American startups are leading the bitcoin charge, and the U.S. government was the first to issue guidance on using the currency as payment -- a seemingly tacit recognition of bitcoin’s validity as legal tender.
Why China Poses A Threat
Feng Li, the IDG partner who chose to fund Coinbase, said the Chinese have yearned for access to a virtual currency since the central government cracked down on the use of Q coins.
Q coins were introduced in March 2002 by Tencent Holdings Ltd. (HKG:0700), the parent company of the country’s most popular instant-messaging service, QQ , and they currently average an annual transaction value of more than 1 billion yuan ($163 million). That value is growing at about 15 to 25 percent each year.
Q coins, purchased with yuan, are predominantly used to buy virtual products and services in QQ and its related online games and social media. Originally, Tencent regulations prevented Q coins from being traded between users or converted back to yuan, but allowed users to trade points and purchase Q coins with their game accounts, then use the black market to convert them into cash. That caused concerns at the People’s Bank of China, China’s central bank. In January 2007, converting game points to Q coins was banned, and Tencent reiterated that Q coins constitute a product, not a currency, which seemed to satisfy the concerns.
“There has already been proof with the Q coin,” Feng said of the Chinese likeliness to start using bitcoin. “It’s been very well circulated and very well adopted.”
Already, shops on Taobao -- the Chinese equivalent to eBay Inc. (NASDAQ:EBAY), owned by Alibaba.com Ltd. (HKG:1688) -- accept bitcoins as payment for goods, as does the similar service, Tencent’s PaiPai.com.
The Chinese are embracing bitcoins in other ways. The first bitcoin fund began to raise money in June, with the goal of raising 20 million yuan. The fund’s investment threshold is 10,000 yuan, and it will mature in four years.
Q coin’s popularity isn’t the only reason bitcoin has appeal in China. As it turns out, China is the perfect place for bitcoin mining. While much of the developed world is well into the transition from personal computers to mobile devices, China’s PC market is still thriving, which provides the necessary computing power to run a successful business converting electricity into mined coins. Price caps on electricity already create wasteful use of energy in China, so running a code-crunching computer for hours on end isn’t as costly an investment as it would be in the U.S. And so-called “gold-mining” or “gold-farming” businesses already exist in China’s cybersphere. None of that will come as a surprise to any “World of Warcraft” player: Gamers in Chinese urban sweatshops are known to sit in front of glowing blue screens for hours, slaughtering players in the game for their spoils or mining gold deposits found in the sprawling milieu of Blizzard Entertainment’s international blockbuster. Those treasures are then sold to players in the game for real money.
China has a heavily controlled currency, which also makes bitcoin attractive.
“The more controlled the currency is, the harder the transactions are, the more friction there is in the national currency, the more appealing the coin is,” Antonopoulos said, noted that the most appealing place to use bitcoin would be a country whose economy is a veritable train wreck -- like Zimbabwe, except that the southern African nation lacks the necessary technology. “I would say China is perfect,” he said. “It’s got the penetration, it’s got the smartphones, it’s got the Internet and the people are familiar with virtual currencies. And, it’s got the not-as-appealing national currency.”
Regulation In The U.S.
Guidance issued in March by the U.S. Treasury Department said that companies issuing or exchanging online cash, including bitcoin, would be subject to the same scrutiny as traditional firms such as the Western Union Co. (NYSE:WU) to prevent money laundering.
Less than two months later, the Department of Homeland Security proved that edict had teeth.
Federal officials obtained a warrant Tuesday to seize an account tied to Mt.Gox, the Tokyo-based exchange company that handles about 80 percent of all bitcoin trades. Authorities accused Mt.Gox’s U.S. subsidiary, Mutum Sigillum LLC, of failing to register as a money-services company with the Treasury’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network. An account held by the online-payments firm Dwolla was subsequently seized.
Many feared the warrant execution could cast a chill over the bitcoin industry as a sector centered on a borderless, decentralized money came under the scrutiny of the federal government.
That proved not to be the case, Coinbase’s Ehrsam said. “For bitcoin to go mainstream, or as it goes mainstream, it will be used in a higher and higher amount of transactions,” he said, adding that Coinbase is registered as a money-services firm. “There’s no way there will be all this money flowing through an unregulated system.”
Chris Larsen -- the CEO of OpenCoin, a fellow San Francisco-based payment platform that processes most national currencies as well as bitcoin and its own virtual cash, Ripple -- agreed. “They definitely are regulating them, [and] we actually think that’s a really good thing for the industry,” he told IBTimes. “I thought the guidance was a good idea. One of the things the guidelines seem to make clear for the first time is that a virtual currency could be used for goods and services.”
The Price Of Regulation
But such regulation is a slippery slope, said Jerry Brito, a senior research fellow at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University.
Perhaps it begins with measures to prevent money-laundering, he said. But what measures would the government take to prevent the untraceable currency from being used for child pornography or human trafficking?
“Bitcoin has the potential to be a disruptive technology that would be beneficial to the economy, and we don’t want to kill off that potential to get at the other potential for bad stuff,” he observed. Brito, who plans to speak next month at a conference on virtual currencies organized by the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, added: “We’re already the first country to enforce money-laundering laws against bitcoin. But the U.S. would be shooting itself in the foot if it went too far [with regulations] and either outlawed bitcoin or made the legal guidelines impossible to comply with.”
Will China Step In?
So far, Chinese bitcoin merchants have little to fear. For many, the CCTV segment on bitcoin seemed to be a signal from Beijing, which heavily controls the channel’s content, that the currency is worth exploring.
Some of those interviewed speculated that the Communist Party wants to see bitcoin stockpiled in China, allowing the government to invest in it if, or when, the dollar is shaken from its perch as the world’s reserve currency.
It remains to be seen whether -- or, more likely, when -- China will intervene in the trade of bitcoin in its own economy. But for the U.S. to experience widespread adoption of the currency, which is considered a necessary step for gaining a grasp on the bitcoin market, limited government control will have to allow the money, like the Internet that birthed it, to develop organically.
submitted by kazzZZY to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

FOR THOSE NOT IN US. CSPAN-3 hearing BITCOIN

Right now, Senator Tom Carper is giving an introduction into what bitcoin can be used to buy. He mentioned buying all goods but specifically spoke of drugs, weapons, and how it can be used to exploit children.
Carper mentioned how the silk road was taken down in a joint effort by the CIA, FBI and dept. of Homeland security.
WILL CONTINUE UPDATING
BITCOIN TIP: public address- 1AkF4HaJrJzXVYuSxifwLUWNEwhbGv5sXu
3:10 EST: jennifer Shasky calvery- Treasury Department - Financial Crimes Mythili Ramen (head of the Dept. of Justic Crimnal Division) Edward Lowry- special agent in charge of criminal investigation division
3:13 EST - jennifer Shasky calvery statement. 'Recognizing new payment methods must keep pace with laws against money laundering and illegal money transfers. Users of virtual currencies don't have transaction limits, is secure, can be used for money laundering. Illicit actors use virtual currencies in order to launder money, enable drug trafficking and move child abuse forward.
For businesses, complying with Federal laws is good for the business integrity.
Bringing virtual currencies into regulation will be positive for the US financial system.
3:20 EST: Mythili Raman
Virtual currencies are viewed through the lens of crimnal activity. Criminals will always look for new ways to hide their crimes. The criminal division's main aim is to reduce the ability of criminals to use virtual currencies for illegal activity.
Virtual currencies (as long as the comply with laws) are not illegal. They can be convenient for consumers because they are quick. These same currencies can also be used by criminals for drugs, weapon sales, and child pornography.
In 2007 - EGOLD moved 6 million dollars per day which may have been used for sale of drugs and child pornograpgy
When virtual currencies fail to live up to their Financial Laws, the Justice division will come after them.
Silk road- the largest online marketplace for illegal substances accepts BITCOINs exclusively for payment. When silk road was shut down, the US sized upwards of 70 million dollars from the silk road website.
The US justice department is encouraged by virtual currencies reaching out to comply with FINCEN's laws. (Financial Crimes. Enforcement Network)
3:27 EST- Edward Lowry Digital currencies have continually grown over the past 17 years. Since Criminals and other illegal organizations use virtual currencies such as E-gold and Liberty reserve for illegal operations
As FINCEN emphasized, digital currency exchanges MUST comply with money laundering laws.
The secret service has successfully found and arrested leaders of illegal organizations whom use digital currencies to fund their activities.
Digital currencies are tools used by a wide variety of criminals. The secret service and ICE (immigration and customs enforcement) cooperate with FINCEN in order to find criminals who use virtual currencies for money laundering.
3:34 EST Sen. Tom Caper Asks about the early days of virtual currencies as well as what the future holds for future currencies.
3:35 EST- Jennifer Shasky Calvery When there is a new "player" in the currency industries, most people think about the gaps that will exist in the market and how criminals will use it for illegal activity. Moving forward with change is very important though, so regulation is necessary.
3:36 EST- Mythili Ramen Virtual currencies are not illegal as long as they comply with money laundering laws. The Criminal division needs to be vigilant towards virtual currencies in order to make sure they actively attempt to comply with laws.
3:38 EST -Edward Lowry The secret service's hallmark is to adopt their defenses to an ever changing threat.
3:39 EST- Sen. Tom Carper "what roll does the legislative body need in order to combat the dark side of this technology?"
3:41 EST - Edward Lowry Device fraud- today anyone in the world can reach anyone else in the world. This has changed how ICE and the secret service must combat illegal activity.
making his case for more money to his department
3:42 EST- Sen. Tom Carper - Can Law enforcement keep up with the changing technology?"
3:44 EST- Mythili Ramen Liberty reserve was taken down in a coordinated arrest done by the US branches joined with other governments. The ability of the criminal division is evolving just as much as criminal activity is evolving.
3:47 EST- jennifer Shasky calvery Congress passing the Bank secrecy act. in 2011, the justice dept needed flexibility in order to combat digital currencies. With the USA patriot act sec 311, gives FINCEN the authority to name a foreign entity as using money laundering, and thus cut off from the US market.
3:49 EST- Sen. Tom Carper - "Give examples of how virtual currencies have worked out for the good"
3:50 EST- jennifer Shasky calvery
Online banking and ACH (picture deposit) makes money exchange much easier for the consumer. But with each of these, we had to think about how criminals could exploit it.
"CASH IS STILL THE BEST MEANS FOR LAUNDERING MONEY" - jennifer Shasky calvery
3:52 EST- Sen. Tom Carper " Do you see gaps in our legislation regarding virtual currencies?"
3:53 EST- Edward Lowry
The secret service recognizes that the high level cyber criminals HAVE NOT moved towards P2P currencies such as bitcoin. Many high-level criminals use centralized online currencies based in places with less regulatory laws.
3:54 EST- Sen. Tom Carper "Which agencies need to be at the forefront of recognizing virtual currencies"
3:55 EST- Mythili Ramen The FBI, DEA, OFAC, IRS are necessary participators but are already participators. The National crime agency in the UK has also participated. The Criminal division invites any other entities for help in identifying emerging threats and what governments can do about them
Currently, the criminal statutes used thus far have been effective. The substantive criminal statute, murder statute, and money laundering statutes have already been used to prosecute criminals that use virtual currencies.
Many updates to laws can still be made.
3:59 EST- Sen. Tom Carper The JAO reports with the help of the IRS on "tax gap." 100's of millions of dollars in taxes that are owed to the treasury. The number is going down over the past 10 years
In may of this year, "virtual currencies could prevent a real vulnerability in the current system."
Question, "do you know the current guidance of that status?"
4:02 EST- Jennifer Shasky Calvery
FINCEN, once it collects financial data, disseminates the information to law enforcement. This is not only for taxes but also for evidence against criminals.
The JAO and FINCEN are working diligently to modify tax laws to incorporate virtual currencies.
The focus of FINCEN is to combat illegal use of virtual currencies while still within U.S laws. Conveniently, many of the laws are very flexible.
4:06 EST- Sen. Tom Carper After the SILK ROAD shut down, many have popped up in its place. "How do we combat these websites?"
4:07 EST- Edward Lowry
We believe there are 3 infrastructures in place. The SILK ROAD forums, the digital currencies (those which fall outside of the guidance of FINCEN), and "bulletproof hosting" -an organization that provides web hosting to anyone with servers in countries with little regulation.
4:09 EST- Mythili Ramen
The main problem is anonymity. The criminal division has created tools and strategies to combat this. (not said) but this is the TOR javascript exploit We have been successful in combating criminals who use anonymity to continue illegal activity.
4:10 EST- Sen. Tom Carper
Bitcoin and virtual currencies may move overseas to countries with less regulatory agencies. What can we do to combat this? How do we make business stay in the US?
4:12 EST-jennifer Shasky Calvery
Bitcoin is going to be a big player in the future of the exchange of goods and services. The financial action task force does a good job at making the countries around the world comply with regulatory laws.
4:15 EST - Mythili Ramen
This hearing is important for the law agencies because talking about these problems is not easy. Virtual currencies in of themselves are not illegal. Innovation is important. Just as criminals have done for ages, this is just another means for illegal activity. We need to stay vigilant in keeping pace with evolving virtual currencies.
4:17 EST- Edward Lowry The secret service will continue to work strategically to remove the gravest structures to the [US] infrastructure. We are going to have to adopt and jump over hurdles but we will work with foreign partners to make this happen. We will continue to work as a part of DHS to eliminate these threats. We believe that aggressive acts by law enforcement will benefit the world as a whole
4:18 EST-Jennifer Shasky Calvery
I heard a CEO of a fairly large bank say, "having the privilege to be a part of the financial industry comes with great responsibility. While innovation is a wonderful thing, it does come with obligations to become part of the US financial system. Regulation in place have help in minimizing the risk and the burden. We ask that businesses do this, put in place AML protections, register with FINCEN, maintain records (including suspicious reports)
We believe that these requests are reasonable because these currencies have already been used for illicit activity.
4:21 EST- Sen. Tom Carper
"This has been a thought provoking and encouraging discussion"
"It's not true We have to choose between a stronger economy and a clean environment"
"Is it possible to reap the benefits of this virtual currencies while still being able to clean up criminal activity?"
-RECESS- and change of panel
4:28 EST Introduction by Sen. Tom Carper Ernie Allen- Centre for missing & Exploited children Patrick Murck-General council of BITCOIN foundation Jerry Brito-Senior researcher of Technology at George Mason university. Jeremy Allaire- Circle Internet Financial CEO
4:30 EST- Ernie Allen Our goal is to bring people together to protect the digital economy while combating its misuse. We are excited for digital currencies to give "banking" to adults all over the world. Our concern today is the use of digital currencies in child pornography. Most countries have not added regulation to digital currencies.
Over the past year, I have consulted financial experts of this issue. Child pornography is being created and disseminated by using anatomizing technologies and virtual currencies.
Freedom hosting was shut down by law enforcement by penetrating a loophole in freedom hosting's servers which gave users identities away.
Most of the arrests of those using anonymous networks are of those who are misusing the network. Because of this, we believe that we are not catching the high-level criminals who are using these networks.
We can press for global cooperation to solve these problems. Digital currencies move from nation to nation.
We need to address the core problem which is internet anonymity. An environment in which child exploiters can thrive and not be caught should not be allowed.
Anonymity allows illegal activity, but also acts to give a voice to those against oppressive regimes.
4:39 EST- Patrick Murck There is no single bitcoin company that manages the value of bitcoin or the trade of bitcoins.
Bitcoin is like email for money. It is secure any completely transparent. Bitcoin can operate without 3rd parties.
Financial exclusion is a problem for the US. There is a rising tide of un-banked people within our borders. Bitcoin can help move people from a trapped economy to a globally connected economy.
Just like any currency, bitcoin can be used for illegal activity. It is no easier to commit crime with bitcoin then it is with any other currency.
Keeping the bitcoin network safe is all of out opportunity. When the SILK ROAD was shut down, the bitcoin community was excited.
Bitcoin is not some magical cloaking device that allows criminals free reign. The use of bitcoins is not un-regulated. The exchanges have a deep understanding of how to effectively allow users to trade bitcoin with fiat currencies.
Bitcoin exchanges- "If you give us clear rules, we will work to abide by them"
We would like to thank FINCEN to opening up the dialog about bitcoin. The bitcoin foundation looks forward to continuing in this dialog with the government and the public.
4:47 EST- Jeremy Allaire
As bitcoin moves into mainstream acceptance, it is important that governments fully understand how to include bitcoin into existing laws.
Bitcoin allows innovation in currency, exchange, and payment that many other currencies cannot offer. Much of our current infrastructure for finances has existed before the internet was invented.
It is a risk if the government doesn't support businesses that want to use bitcoins. Such businesses may be encouraged to move offshore.
The U.S. falls behind in this critical economic innovation. A bitcoin exchange in CHINA has become the single largest currency exchange in the world . We need to be open and evolving.
4:53 EST Jerry Brito
From facebook credit to world of warcraft gold, Virtual currencies are nothing new.
Prior to Bitcoins invention in 2009, all virtual currencies needed to be exchanged through an intermediary.
Emerging technologies allow great benefits but great risks. 3-d printers revolutionize personal creation, but also creation of guns.
While Bitcoin transactions don't need intermediaries, many exchanges can still convert government currency to bitcoins.
Criminals are more likely to use centralized currencies because they can lie about how much money has been moved. Currencies such the bitcoin infrastructure show every transaction that happens.
The U.S. could loose it's headstart on an emerging economy if it chooses to create strong regulatory laws.
4:59 EST- Sen. Tom Carper
"Where is the general agreement on the panel, and if not, how can we make agreement?"
5:00 EST- Ernie Allen There is clear agreement that we can't just ignore the misuse, and that the misuse jeopardizes the currency in the long run.
5:02 EST Patrick Murck
There is a real need to create on ramps into the traditional economic system. The biggest obstacle to that happening is the ability of businesses to get bank accounts in the current system, even a checking account.
If you have the word "bitcoin" anywhere around you, your file will be cast aside.
5:04 EST- Jeremy Allaire
Anonymity needs to be addressed in some way
POST IS TOO LONG, LINK TO PART II
http://www.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/1qxgc9/for_those_not_in_us_cspan3_hearing_bitcoin/
submitted by hand_jibber to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Three Good Posts That Got Buried Today

In case anyone was wondering, some other really good stuff got posted today:
World's First Insured Bitcoin Storage Service Launches in UK
Vice Interviews Jerry Brito
Wired - After Crackdown a New Bitcoin King Emerges in China
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Question: Is the Coin Center protect the Small Business bitcoiners or not ?

I am a New York City small bitcoin business and used to have 150 stores processing Bitcoins until the Bitlicense came about. I decided to fight and I have been fighting for two years now.
I came about this entry about the a Coin Center having a Gala and I became upset and started this twitter Hashtag : #BoycottCoinCenterGala - https://coincenter.org/entry/blockchain-s-night-out-the-coin-center-annual-dinner-is-back
I feel that the Coin Center has not been advocating for the Small Business but for themselves. When Judges start dissecting bitcoin they clearly see that the law doesn't apply (Florida Case as an example.)
Jerry Brito, and other from the Coin Center were part of the Bitcoin Foundation and wrote compelling letters to NYDFS, but then were never heard from again once it was enacted.
http://www.dfs.ny.gov/legal/vcrf_0500/20140813%20-%20VC%20Proposed%20Reg%20Comment%2075%20-Mercatus%20Center%20-%20Brito-Dourado.pdf
Most of the people at the Coin Center are New Yorkers like me (and some are even lawyers) so reading trough a legal brief is not too hard, even badly written. They could have supported the action, etc ..... but nothing.
The bitcoin community need to hold them accountable if they don't protect Small Businesses and before I start rushing, I would like to hear from the Bitcoin community.
Regards, Theo Chino @TheoBitcoin http://www.article78againstNYDFS.com
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FOR THOSE NOT IN US. CSPAN-3 hearing BITCOIN

LINK TO PART I:
http://www.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/1qx3yfor_those_not_in_us_cspan3_hearing_bitcoin/
WILL CONTINUE UPDATING
BITCOIN TIP: public address- 1AkF4HaJrJzXVYuSxifwLUWNEwhbGv5sXu
5:05 EST Jerry Brito A decentralized currency are not a greater risk than centralized currencies for money laundering.
The danger is that real hardworking entrepreneurs looking to comply will not find that the US is helpful in economic prospect.
5:07 EST- Jeremy Allaire
the digital currency business may be different from other internet businesses. I do not think that two men should not be able to start a business unless it has capital to keep users safe.
5:10 EST Patrick Murck
The states have an interest in protecting their consumers. In the EU, there is a system of reciprocity. Perhaps that is a system that would work here [the us] but that is up to legislators. 5:11 EST- Jerry Brito
guidance says that you are not required to register with FINCEN if you are buying goods or services, only if you are sending money and exchanging it back into government money.
This is a new industry that is still trying to find it's way. The folks trying to participate in this economy are not your average consumers. During this time, we can learn if the existing laws are working or even if they are enough.
Digital currencies provide a new choice for users. Currently, If you want to send money electronically, you will be have to pay a fee. This is so most of your transactions can be reversed.
With BITCOIN, payments cannot be reversed but the fees are very very low.
5:19 EST- Jeremy Allaire When we pay a bill online, or a check in a restaurant, we are effectively giving away the keys to our bank accounts. When using bitcoin, you never give away your account information when making a transaction.
Increasingly, because of ease of use, consumers are using services that host their bitcoins on the internet.
5:23 EST Patrick Murck
Bitcoin is still at version 0.9. We have yet to make it to version 1.0. Because of this, the market is still very volital and consumers should be aware of this.
The creator or creators go by the nickname "Satoshi Nakamoto." Much of their original code has been reinforced and changed so who he is is nearly irrelevant.
5:27 EST - Jerry Brito
Patrick is right in saying that the creator is not important. Much of the code actually has been changed. Additionally, all of the code that represents the bitcoin protocol is open source so anyone can see how it works.
5:29 EST Sen. Tom Carper
We wanted to hold this hearing to understand the pitfalls of the currency but also the benefits. The testimonies from our panel have been encouraging.
We all have work to do to minimize the bad and maximize the good.
The vote will stay open for 15 days. (janet yellen vote) Link:http://www.marketwatch.com/story/senate-banking-panel-sets-thursday-vote-on-yellen-2013-11-18?mod=latestnews&link=sfmw
END OF SESSION
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Trump bans Venezuela’s new national cryptocurrency

This is the best tl;dr I could make, original reduced by 28%. (I'm a bot)
President Donald Trump has issued an executive order to ban Venezuela's new national cryptocurrency, the petro.
His order also makes reference to Venezuela's National Assembly being in opposition to the launch of the petro.
In February, Venezuela launched the petro, allegedly raising $735 million, according to Maduro's tweet.
Many experts have expressed doubt over the digital currency, which Maduro has proposed as a means for Venezuela to "Overcome the financial blockade," likely in reference to sanctions imposed by the US and the EU. Venezuela's actual national currency, the bolivar, suffers from quadruple-figure inflation, and one bolivar is currently worth 0.00003 USD. The executive order to ban the petro isn't that surprising, considering the US's current sanctions on Venezuela.
The US Treasury warned domestic investors back in February not to touch petro in case it violated sanctions, saying "The petro digital currency would appear to be an extension of credit to the Venezuelan government" and "Could therefore expose US persons to legal risk."
"While Venezuela's attempt to issue a cryptocurrency is novel, there's nothing new about the US restricting financial dealings with sanctioned countries," says think tank Coin Center executive director Jerry Brito, "Issuing a cryptocurrency is not going to help Venezuela escape sanctions."
Summary Source | FAQ | Feedback | Top keywords: Venezuela#1 petro#2 sanctions#3 order#4 Maduro#5
Post found in /technology, /BitcoinAll, /Bitcoin and /Techfeed.
NOTICE: This thread is for discussing the submission topic. Please do not discuss the concept of the autotldr bot here.
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I am confused about this California regulation.

According to Coin Center:
A new amended draft of California's AB 1326, a bill that would specify the state's licensing regime for digital currency businesses, was released last weekend and it's good news for us and Bitcoin advocates everywhere. Coin Center has been at the forefront of working with California lawmakers to help them better understand digital currencies and craft legislation that will encourage financial innovation in the state. Executive director Jerry Brito, who will be testifying before the California Senate later this evening, explains why the bill looks so promising.
Meanwhile: http://www.coindesk.com/digital-advocacy-groups-critical-of-california-bitcoin-regulation/
I am not entirely clear why regulating an already regulated industry is "good news for us and Bitcoin advocates everywhere." Also, I thought that libertarians were actually opposed to new regulation. Did Hayek, von Mises, Rothbard, etc, get it wrong?
Perhaps someone cleverer than me can explain?
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Coin Center: US Senate's Digital Currency Bill Is 'Counterproductive'

This is the best tl;dr I could make, original reduced by 45%. (I'm a bot)
An anti-money laundering bill before the US Senate and focused in part on digital currencies "Could upset years of policy and compliance work", according to Washington, DC, advocacy group Coin Center.
A new blog post penned by Coin Center executive director Jerry Brito dives into the specifics of the bill, arguing that the Combating Money Laundering, Terrorist Financing and Counterfeiting Act of 2017 - introduced in late May by a group of influential senators - largely replicates rules put in place by the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network, which first issued guidance on digital currency activities in 2013 and later 2014.
"Almost all of the digital currency specific language in the bill is now covered under existing money laundering law, and, if left as drafted, the proposed changes would be counterproductive to combatting money laundering."
In the post, Coin Center takes aim at the addition of "Issuer, redeemer, or cashier of ... digital currency ... or any digital exchanger or tumbler of digital currency" to the definition of what constitutes a financial institution under the US Bank Secrecy Act, which was first instituted in the 1970s.
According to Brito, the addition is again redundant in the context of FinCEN rules, "Making this section of S. 1241 bill redundant with current law."
Coin Center also honed in on fears that digital currency holdings could be subject to declaration and seizure at the US border, with Brito noting that, at present, the bill calls for a report on how customs agents might approach this process.
Summary Source | FAQ | Feedback | Top keywords: digital#1 currency#2 Brito#3 bill#4 new#5
Post found in /Bitcoin, /BitcoinAll and /BTCNews.
NOTICE: This thread is for discussing the submission topic. Please do not discuss the concept of the autotldr bot here.
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20 Days Left: Best practices for submitting BitLicense comments to NYDFS

TL;DR: Everyone capable of writing articulate, cogent public comments to NYDFS should take the time to send an email to Mr. Dana Syracuse if you haven't already.
Here's how and why:
Over the past few weeks, I have highlighted eloquent public responses to the proposed BitLicense framework from Circle executives, the Mercatus Institute, and various individual bitcoin enthusiasts. Many other leading bitcoin companies will respond directly to the NYDFS with carefully crafted comments that highlight their specific concerns in the coming weeks. Of course, I have also contributed my own thoughts via this blog, and will continue to do so throughout the rest of the public comment period.
So it might be easy for you, the individual enthusiast, or you, the casual investor, or you, the student entrepreneur, to assume that your feelings and perspectives have been or will be properly covered by the myriad other responses.
In truth, it's a fair assumption that the only comments which actually rise to the top of the NYDFS pile for real consideration will be those sent by larger advocacy groups, funded virtual currency startups, institutional investors, and the law firms representing those groups.
But that doesn't mean that smart, polished individual contributions are wastes of time. On the contrary, when it comes to many important subjects, such as advocacy for a safe harbor provision for startups and arguments in favor of limited regulation of open-source software, these perspectives will be invaluable.
Whether they are read in their entirety initially means very little actually. However, whether you realize it or not, we're already prepping for part two of what will be a lengthy turf war: the BitLicense courtroom battles.
The BitLicense lawsuits, "discovery" & "arbitrary and capricious" standards
A quick conversation with any of bitcoin's top legal experts or executives will give you a clear indication that many of the BitLicense's proposals are almost guaranteed to be fought in court. As a regulator, you simply don't pare back your initial guidelines drastically, regardless of the public outcry. Maybe the NYDFS clarifies its loosest language and strips its most outlandish requirements, but the core proposals will still be an onerous and crippling overreach of power. And they will have to be challenged aggressively.
There's an element of face-saving in play. Politicians and their regulatory cousins simply don't admit fault very easily. This is especially true given the time, energy and resources that this particular department has thrown at crafting these initial proposals. Lawsky and his colleagues seem likely to default to strict rules and overreach because it is easier to be tough on crime than permissive of disruptive innovation - in terms of both talking points and future political (and financial) backing on Wall Street.
Thus, we need to start digging in for a prolonged battle when it comes to many of the provisions that matter most to bitcoin's future viability.
The Bitcoin community needs to submit droves of comments that can later be referenced in lawsuits against the department related to its "arbitrary and capricious" prescriptions. Every well-spoken entrepreneur or $1,000 bitcoin investor should send comments which bash requirements that overreach relative to existing federal regulations of MSBs, or that restrict unsanctioned releases of open-source software of any kind, or that include non-financial applications under its broad scope.
Your comments really only need three things.
The first is context. Who are you? Why should your comments be taken seriously (assume by a judge, not the department)? And how will the BitLicense harm you? On the last point, it is key to focus on how the proposals will unfairly and potentially illegally harm you. You need not cover everything wrong with the BitLicense (others will do that for you), but specificity is key.
The second, then, is specificity. Be direct and specific about which elements of the BitLicense are flawed in their language, scope or essence. Use specific examples and highlight precedents from other technological turf wars (the internet, VoIP, etc.), and keep it concise and powerful.
Finally, the third is recommendations. It isn't enough to crap on the BitLicense's very existence. (Regulators gonna regulate.) What you need to do is highlight specific language in the proposals and suggest actual improvements or outright redactions. If you haven't yet read Jerry Brito's public comments out of the Mercatus Center, it might inform your own approach.
Any public comment which is smart, devoid of rhetoric, and includes these three elements will be valuable in "discovery", the legal procedures used to gather evidence for any future lawsuits. A future plaintiff representing the interests of bitcoin should have dozens of readily available resources which hammer the department for ignoring the reasonable pushback of the broader community on the most outlandish components of the BitLicense. (These documents are easily obtained through a Freedom of Information Act, or FOIA, request.)
How then should you actually submit public comments?
As a community, we have just 20 more days to submit comments to the NYDFS related to the BitLicense. All of this "testimony" should be electronic and submitted to Mr. Dana Syracuse via email at [email protected]. It appears that we have until close of business on Monday, September 8 to submit comments, but Perkins Coie recommends getting all final comments in prior to midnight on Friday, September 5 just to be safe.
The firm has also provided a helpful template for those of you not used to writing business emails to bureaucrats:
[Your letterhead including your address and contact info]
[Date]
Mr. Benjamin M. Lawsky Superintendent of Financial Services New York Department of Financial Services One State Street, New York, NY 10004-1511
Mr. Dana V. Syracuse Office of General Counsel New York State Department of Financial Services One State Street, New York, NY 10004 Tel: (212) 709-1663 Email: [email protected]
Re: Regulation of the Conduct of Virtual Currency Businesses – Addition of Part 200 to Title 23 NYCRR
Dear Mr. Lawsky and Mr. Syracuse:
[Add your comments here]
Sincerely,
[Your Signature]
[Your Name] [Your Company Name] [Your Title]
You should sign and scan and email the letter to [email protected].
The text of your cover email could be simply: Please see attached comment letter on the proposed BitLicense rules.
Hope this all helps.
Cheers, TBI
P.S. If you'd like to refer to other high-quality public comments, check out Jerry Brito's at the Mercatus Center, Attorney Sean King's, or my own.
Brito's: mercatus.org/sites/default/files/BritoDourado-NY-Virtual-Currency-comment-081414.pdf
King's: http://wefivekingsblog.blogspot.com/2014/07/here-are-my-official-comments-on-new.html
My own (so far): http://two-bit-idiot.tumblr.com/post/93350027099/the-bitlicense-papers-1 http://two-bit-idiot.tumblr.com/post/94029914389/the-bitlicense-papers-2 http://two-bit-idiot.tumblr.com/post/94458273399/the-bitlicense-papers-3
submitted by twobitidiot to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Jerry Brito's Remarks at the Coin Center Annual Dinner 2016 Jerry Brito on regulatory approaches to Bitcoin's fast ... Jerry Brito Discusses Bitcoin at the Committee on Small ... Jerry Brito Talks About Bitcoin Jerry Brito - YouTube

Jerry Brito said the latest installment of the Bill did not explain how companies enrolled in the program would be exempt from money transmission licensing. “We would expect the creation of a ... Posted in Bitcoin News, Featured, Industry, News Tagged Bitcoin, Craig Warmke, David Andolfatto, Jerry Brito, St. Louis Federal Reserve Leave a comment on You May Not Know This but There’s No Such Thing as “a Bitcoin” In an interview on CTV News, Jerry Brito argues that there is a real future for digital money. Q: "Ok, lets talk about mintchip, tell me about Jerry Brito. Executive Director. @jerrybrito. All articles by Jerry. Are regulators poised to demand cryptocurrency address whitelisting? Probably not. August 31, 2020. The ideal regulatory environment for Bitcoin August 25, 2020. Do we really need more guidance from FinCEN? July 16, 2020. How the OCC can clear a path for financial technology entrepreneurs May 21, 2020. SEC Commissioner ... The CFTC held a meeting today to discuss bitcoin and its potential effects on US derivatives markets. Jerry Brito Bitcoin Think Tank Coin Center Launches with Star-Studded Support

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Jerry Brito's Remarks at the Coin Center Annual Dinner 2016

From Brookings' Beyond Bitcoin event. 1/14/2016 Beginners Guide Part 8 - How is Bitcoin Legal with Peter Van Valkenburgh & Jerry Brito Bitcoin is still a relatively new technology. However, it is already a very real threat to government-issued ... Jerry Brito Videos; Playlists; Channels; Discussion; About; Home Trending History Get YouTube Premium Get YouTube TV Best of YouTube Music Sports Gaming Movies TV Shows News Live Fashion Learning ... Coin Center Executive Director Jerry Brito on what Coin Center does to protect and foster Bitcoin innovation. Full text available here: https://coincenter.or... The Bitcoin Byte interview with Jerry Brito, a senior research fellow at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University and director of its Technology Policy Program. He dives deep into some of ...

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